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20130421
20130421
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
some restrictions, but you guys are fantastic at bringing in laws. so, maybe you can create some kind of law. you're so good at that. you would be the country to start that, i would be quite certain. we have to go about 10 steps through parliament and it takes 20 years to change a law. i think you can do it overnight. [laughter] >> well, maybe. thank you. (applause) >> we have another answer. >> if i might very quickly. >> yes, of course. >> i have worked with aerosol with youth on murals as well as individual projects. i've also done collage. we've done paint pens. we have used a number of different things from silk screen t-shirts to making logos. my experience with these youth is you might engage them through graffiti. you don't have to use arrow zoll. it's expensive. it's anywhere from 8 to $14 a can wherever you get it. and you also have to then worry about protecting the eyes, the hands and the proper respirator which could be 35 to $50 apiece per youth. so, to me it's a really expensive way to engage that graffiti side of the artistic or creative behavior. at the same time, mon
if you're in law enforce. you're probably going to want to write this down. no graph.net. randy campbell has been working in graffiti cases forever and he's a retired, i think, sheriff or highway patrolman. maybe somebody can help me out there. >> highway patrol. >> highway patrolman. what he runs it's no ground.net. for law enforcement, if you're looking for a tagger you think is crossing state boundaries and you catch one and you want to put up that person's tag to other law enforcement agencies, he's got a network where you can do that. so, you send that in to him, he sends it out and it goes to hundreds of cities. if you're looking for somebody and you think that other cities might know who that is, put that out and he'll send it out to all those cities. so, e-mail him and get on his network. he's got a website. and he's a great resource for law enforcement specifically and everybody else, too, but law enforcement specifically to help you find graffiti vandals or to add on to cases if you do find a graffiti vandal. so, this is for randy campbell. thanks. (applause) >> good news. rebe
never do that or couldn't do that because of the laws in my political jurisdiction or whatever, we are not allowed to do that. then there's going to be other things when you think, gosh, i never thought about that, i think that would work really good. i'm going to take it back it my jurisdiction. probably over the past few years i've got 500 people i've dealt with, officers that have come to the class and subsequently become gravanis experts and set up programs. almost every program is different. a lot of the basis is the same, the information is consistent worldwide but people will tweak what information they are going to use and how they are going to be allowed to operate. some are in plain cars, some in marked units, it all depends how it's going to go. take the information you get, there's so much good information here today and tomorrow, take the information you want, take it back and integrate it into however you are going to work your program. when we come right down to it, it's not important what you know, it's what you can prove in court. probably every officer sittin
the information we need to keep them safe and also we let the police -- law enforcement know this program is happening and when it's happening so that they're hypersensitive to it. >> i'm going to go back over here and we have a couple comments. i think we're going to stick with this topic a little bit because it looks like there's a lot of interest. i'll get back to you after this gentleman back here. and i'll hold the mic and you just speak into it, okay, sir. let me get on this side of it and go ahead. >> don't wait until somebody gets assaulted like i did. make sure you're proactive about that issue. since i was jumped in june, what we do is a recon so we know where all the gang tags are because they're a problem. so, i make out a list. i draw out a map. i know how to hit them in 45 minutes or less. i want my officers back out on the street. i don't want them baby-sitting me. but i never go in alone again. i carry some protection. i get a three-vehicle escort. our police department is all behind this. i use magnetic signs on my vehicle now and i always wear a safety vest. never go alo
better decisions, better policies. this term algorithmic regulation, which means you can have laws and policies in the cities determined by data and not just what we think is best, but what's actually best. so, as cities keep catching on and more and more with the data, you're going to see some really interesting things coming out. >> cool. while we're talking about data, another part of the announcement today was also motion loft making private data available within sort of that initiative and that website wrieri'd like to hear a little more, john, about kind of deciding to share that data with the city and also a lot of times especially with other companies you see them being very protective of their data. there is a lot of value there. how do you sort of balance, protecting the value of your data and commercial viability versus making it available to the public? >> so, we have a unique problem, i think, to a lot of start-ups in the fact that we have a product that we sell and a lot of different vertical. we also have data we want to provide to the society at large. and how do we
by law was amended requiringing property owners it remove graffiti from their property or face a $250 crime. the one success from our program was the council at that time looked at the idea that we can't hold citizens responsible if we're not responsible ourselves, so they created our management program at that time. that includes bylaw enforcement as well as civic clean up and support for property owners. the program expanded again in 2009 to include a cigarette litter reduction program. we have a huge problem in our city with cigarette litter. we found that through our litter audits that we have done, we have a higher rate of cigarette litter in our cities compared to other cities in canada. expanded again in 2010 to include needle disposal and i said in the other session, this is what i am escaping from in edmonton right now. yay, san francisco. so we have a snow angel program where we ask citizens to voluntarily shovel the snow off their neighbor's lawns. so these are all the programs offered by the capital city clean up program. we started in 2005 as part of the waste man
requirements? >> no, the new construction has to meet the requirements of today's code. they could have by law built the new tower to meet today's code and leave the old building to meet the old conditions. >> it was so badly damaged the city required it to be retrofitted. there was a retrofit done while debating whether to dynamite it. >> any new addition has to meet today's code. any part of the old building that supports the new addition vertically or laterally has to address today's code. we will walk a block down and look at the rialto building. (♪ music playing ) >> we're still here on mission street at the corner of annie alley. they're named, somebody told me they're named for san francisco's early famous ladies. (chuckling). >> i want to point out the building here at 660 mission street, which i believe is an unreinforced masonry building retrofitted, seismically upgraded. once it is seismically upgraded, it is safe, right? >> when you seismically upgrade it, it is to a standard it doesn't collapse, but it may not be reusable or repairable. >> it was an economic decision of how
over gang graffiti? any law enforcement? >> we do. >> do you? >> [speaker not understood]. >> take the mic, walk it over. >> tagging is tagging. if you're set for work release or work service, community service, [speaker not understood]. now, our -- when we're doing a lot of volunteers, we had to go with it because we had a nonprofit to clean up. when they did our clean up, they were actually reformed gangsters themselves. they had opened a nonprofit and they were doing paint overs. they were pretty astute at assessing the juveniles and assessing the areas they were in. what we've done since then, we lost our nonprofit, now everybody who does graffiti, we generally send out, not the paint, we send out to strip the toilets and public parks, pick up dog poop at the dog park. pick up something that was disgusting and they don't get a chance to paint at all. we would see where they would paint over and they would forget the part with their gang and they would paint over. they would use a roller and put stuff behind. we've done that. we've only walked away from it only because we haven'
and facilitator in the program from a law enforcement background. and the grant we get through public works really allows us to run effectively. >> great, thank you. >> [speaker not understood]. let me come on over here. what's your question? >> okay. [speaker not understood]. i've gotten three years of knowledge [speaker not understood]. my question is this. how am i going to get the police department, how am i going to get city council -- they're partially on board, but some of our people in public works are here today. how can
with duct tape. there should be a law. have your disaster kit in that room, have snacks available for kids. turn off the hvac, heating, ventilation air conditioning units because you don't want to be blowing in or sucking in the vapor cloud outside. fireplace, close the dampers and seal off your shelter in place room by using duct tape and terms of the emergency alert system. listen to the radio. that's it. do not try to call the school, try to pick up your children because do you want to leave the area? no, you want to shelter in place. people own pets. do not risk your safety for pets. in summary, it is likely you are at an incident that may be involved with bnice, your safety is the most important. limit your time, get your distance away from that and some type of shielding and listen to the emergency alert system, your radio. . >> there's an acronym that we use to use an extinguisher. what's that acronym? we're going to take turns putting out this fire. you can see that it will make a pretty big mess but at least it put out the fire in your house or something like that. so when we want
really act as a good communicator and facilitator in the program from a law enforcement background. and the grant we get through public works really allows us to run effectively. >> great, thank you. >> [speaker not understood]. let me come on over here. what's your question? >> okay. [speaker not understood]. i've gotten three years of knowledge [speaker not understood]. my question is this. how am i going to get the police department, how am i going to get city council -- they're partially on board, but some of our people in public works are here today. how can i convey to them that i'm not a nut -- everybody here thinks i'm a nut because [speaker not understood]. how did they really take this seriously and realize that graffiti is a crime and it requires money and it requires attention from the officials, not just from covering graffiti? is there an answer? can you give me some sort of -- what's a good direction? >> [speaker not understood]. >> [speaker not understood]. basically the task force, they'll put together and try to convince the citizens something is happening, then i
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)